10 Easy Herbal Syrups to Make Now for Superb Winter Health

Herbal Syrups for Winter Health

Keeping yourself and your family healthy with herbs doesn’t have to be difficult this winter. You may be thinking of the upcoming battles that could ensue from trying to make little ones (or not so little significant others!) get on board with your perhaps-not-so-pleasant-tasting regimen of herbal teas and tinctures.

Enter homemade herbal syrups. These sweet herbal recipes make it much less difficult to persuade the not-so-herbal among us to try out natural remedies to help support immunity, comfort sore throats, and ease wintertime lung woes.

Herbal syrups are quick and easy to make, plus they taste great. Here are ten recipes from different herbalists that showcase how homemade herbal syrups can become a staple in your winter wellness routines. You’ll find old stand-by’s like elderberry and wild cherry bark syrup on this list alongside a few that might surprise you – so get ready to enjoy the many ways that these herbal syrup recipes will become part of your winter wellness routines.

Elderberry Syrup

Elderberry syrup recipes can be found easily all over the internet (after all, it’s everyone’s favorite winter syrup!), but we particularly like this tasty, no frills version from Live Simply. It features spices you may already have in your kitchen cabinet like cinnamon, clove, and ginger to add a warming boost to elderberry’s immune supporting prowess. Find the recipe here!

Elderberry Syrup

Wild Cherry Bark Syrup

If you are relatively new to herbs, you may not have encountered this traditional cough syrup staple just yet, but we are willing to bet you will love it when you try it. Especially with this recipe from Nitty Gritty Life, that calls for cherry juice to flavor what otherwise is a syrup that packs a slightly bitter, pungent punch.  Here is where you can find out more about how wild cherry bark is traditionally used and find the recipe.

Wild Cherry Bark Syrup

Schisandra Berry Syrup

We love schisandra here at Everyday Dandelions! This unusual berry has a tart flavor that is balanced by salty, sweet, and pungent flavors with just a note of bitter. A good way to describe it might be “bright and resinous.” Schisandra is an adaptogen, so even though it helps support the immune system the benefits of this syrup extend way beyond the usual immune support offered by, say, elderberries. If you are interested in trying schisandra berries for your own winter wellness routines, we love the simplicity of this easy syrup recipe. Who says herbs have to be complicated? Find it here.

Schisandra Berry Syrup

Lemon Honey and Thyme Syrup

You may have thyme tucked away in your kitchen cabinets, but did you know that this herb has also been used traditionally to make cough syrups? We love keeping thyme syrup on hand during winter for the occasional cough, and this recipe combines thyme with honey and lemon for an extra helping of throat soothing goodness. You can find directions for making this recipe here.

Lemon Honey and Thyme Syrup

Ginger Syrup

Ginger syrup is incredibly easy and incredibly tasty. The warming properties of ginger make it a welcome syrup to have on hand during colder weather, and it’s great to use as a sweetener in your favorite tea! Ginger also supports immunity and digestion. We think a bit of ginger syrup and a hot bath are the perfect way to end a chilly day with a little wintertime self care. Here’s a super easy ginger syrup recipe.

Ginger Syrup

 

Conifer and Wild Berry Tonic Syrup

Dried hawthorn berries, conifer needles, and a delicious sprinkling of spices make this warming tonic syrup a must-try for your next syrup. The authors forage many of their ingredients, but you should be able to find hawthorn berries and many of the other ingredients through your favorite herbal supplier.

Warming Tonic Syrup

Sage and Honey Syrup

Sage and honey make the perfect duo for soothing an angry sore throat! Sage is also beloved by herbalists for its warming qualities, which make it another wonderful ally for cold and flu season. An easy recipe for making your own sage herbal syrup can be found here.

Sage and Honey Syrup

Five Flavors Syrup

Elderberry, elecampane, and plantain are included in this herbal cough-support syrup. Although plantain is often thought of as a topical herb, it is actually a wonderful ingredient for herbal lung support formulas. Elecampane root comes from a beautiful plant in the sunflower family. Although this recipe includes a few more ingredients than some of the others on our list, we think it could easily become a staple in your herbal syrup repertoire.

Five Flavors Herbal Cough Syrup

5th Chakra Syrup

This easy recipe uses an herbal tea blend that soothes winter-troubled throats to create an herbal syrup with the same properties. If you have a favorite winter wellness tea, you can easily turn it into a syrup by following the directions and substituting your own tea blend!  Find the recipe and directions here.

5th Chakra Syrup

Rose Hip Syrup

Rose hips are the fruit that develops when certain types of roses finish blooming. They make a tart and delicious herbal syrup that’s packed with vitamin C. Some herbalists grow or forage their own rose hips (and this recipe calls for fresh), but it’s also easy to find dried rosehips through your favorite herbal supplier.

Rose Hip Syrup

Using Herbal Syrups

You can enjoy your herbal syrups neat off the spoon, but if you are still having trouble coaxing your family to try them, you can use herbal syrups to flavor yogurt, oatmeal, or a hot cup of tea to make them even more fun. After trying a few of the recipes listed above, we think you will quickly become just as enamored with herbal syrups as we have!

Learn how to make 10 herbal syrups to support wellness this winter.
Herbal syrups are easy to make at home and add to your winter wellness routines.

2 Replies to “10 Easy Herbal Syrups to Make Now for Superb Winter Health”

  1. 
    Me encontraba tratando de interpretar tu artículo “10 Easy Herbal Syrups to Make Now for Superb Winter Health” y de verdad me gustó demasiado, sólo que pienso que la redacción puede mejorar.

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